How The Human Penis Lost Its Spines

How the human penis lost its spines

You've read the headline, and it probably made you giggle. Go ahead. Get it out of your system. Then take a deep breath and consider how evolution affected a few specific body parts, and why.

Senh: Another interesting nugget from the article is that not having spiny penises allowed us to have bigger brains.

Sections:  news   living   
Topics:  evolution   penis   
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