The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether police investigators seeking to build a criminal case may put a tracking device on a car without first obtaining a search warrant.

Sections:  news   politics   
RELATED ARTICLES
  • Tornado sirens giving way to new warning technology
    On April 10, 2011, tornadoes ripped across Wisconsin, tearing roofs off houses, toppling trees and snapping power lines. In many places, the high winds were greeted with silence as some Cold War-era warning sirens failed because of lost power and other issues — just when they were needed the most. More
  • Court Rules Warrants Are Needed to Draw Blood in Drunken-Driving Cases
    The fact that alcohol dissipates from the bloodstream over time does not by itself allow the police to take blood over objections, the Supreme Court ruled. More
  • High court signals skepticism on patenting genes
    In a Supreme Court test of whether a company can be granted a patent on the genes in the human body, a majority of the justices indicated during Monday's oral arguments that the court is likely to rule that a human gene can’t be patented. More
  • Supreme Court passes on gun rights case
    The United States Supreme Court has declined to take up the hottest question about gun rights now dividing the nation's courts: is there a constitutional right to carry a gun outside the home? The justices today passed up a challenge brought by five residents of New York's Westchester County to a state law that forbids carrying a gun unless a person desiring to do so can show "proper cause" -- some special need for protection that goes beyond a general desire for self-defense. More
  • First Amendment doesn't apply here: N.C. lawmakers push bill for state religion
    Republican lawmakers in North Carolina have introduced a bill declaring that the state has the power to establish an official religion — a direct challenge to the First Amendment. One professor of politics called the measure “the verge of being neo-secessionist,” and another said it was reminiscent of how Southern states objected to the Supreme Court’s 1954 integration of public schools. More

 

Comment On This Story

Welcome to Wopular!

Welcome to Wopular

Wopular is an online newspaper rack, giving you a summary view of the top headlines from the top news sites.

Senh Duong (Founder)
Wopular, MWB, RottenTomatoes

Subscribe to Wopular's RSS Fan Wopular on Facebook Follow Wopular on Twitter Follow Wopular on Google Plus

MoviesWithButter : Our Sister Site

More Politics News